Tag: United Kingdom

Internet Marketing

How to Scale a Tech Startup With Proven Growth Hacking Tactics

Okay, Here’s a fact to get you started on this article:
“According to the latest SBA study, more than 627,000 new businesses are launched every year, and at the same time, about 595,000 businesses shut down per year.”
If we segment our research into tech-startups, it turns out that in every one hour, 80 new companies are launched in the UK alone.
These numbers are a testament to two facts:

There are plenty of opportunities for new companies to start.
There’s such fierce competition that most startups fail to make it big.

These facts definitely make a person question the growth strategies they are using for their organization.
If you want your business to succeed, you have to step out of the conventional approaches of growth and be open to more creative solutions.
Honestly, no one will

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Internet Marketing

Brands and influencers still at loggerheads over campaign control – but progress is being made

How much influence should an influencer have over the material they push? A new study from Takumi has found that half of marketers polled want complete control over influencers’ marketing posts.
The report (pdf, email required), which polled a mix of more than 4,000 consumers, marketers and influencers across the UK, US and Germany, found something of a disconnect between marketer and influencer trust. 86% of marketers polled suggested they trusted influencers, yet Takumi – an influencer marketing platform, it must be noted – suggested brands were likely to ‘stifle results by controlling the creative process.’
Influencers, the report agreed, are facing more scrutiny than ever. When Marissa Casey Grossman (nee Fuchs) unveiled her ‘surprise’ engagement on Instagram in June which was in eventuality a series of carefully-orchestrated stunts pitched

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Internet Marketing

Whether in-house, outsource, or anything in between, agencies can – and do – help

Programmatic is now mainstream – expected to account for almost 90% of digital display ad spend in the UK next year – so brands naturally want to understand it better and gain more control over how their advertising budgets are spent.
To achieve this greater level of understanding and control, many brands are taking steps towards in-housing programmatic. An IAB study conducted across multiple European markets revealed that 86% of programmatically active brands already have some in-house capability. As well as providing the opportunity to learn about the programmatic space, in-housing can enable brands to standardise part of the stack, retain control over their valuable first-party data, and own direct contracts with technology vendors such as demand-side platforms, ultimately increasing transparency.
But, first, we need to be clear:

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Internet Marketing

Case study: How omnichannel communication could bring benefits to social housing

“Many people living in England’s four million social homes feel ignored and stigmatised, too often treated with a lack of respect by landlords who appear remote, unaccountable and uninterested in meeting their needs.”
This is the damning verdict of the UK government’s social housing Green Paper, “A New Deal for Social Housing”, which sets out the government’s aim to rebalance the relationship between landlords and tenants.
In the aftermath of tragedies such as the Grenfell Tower fire, the Government has put the needs of social housing tenants front and centre – an attention unlikely to be altered by the change of Prime Minister. A key component of this is ensuring that those living in social housing are able to air concerns, and that housing associations and councils are engaging with

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Internet Marketing

While JustEat and Uber Eats fight for their share of the turf – restaurants can capitalise

In the last month, JustEat announced more than 100 layoffs as the result of increased competition from Uber Eats and Deliveroo. Meanwhile, Uber just suffered its worst ever financial quarter, losing a staggering £4bn in just three months – even though its share price remained unaffected.
Given the uncertainty surrounding these businesses, predicting the future of the food delivery market is extremely difficult. All three businesses are vying for market domination, targeting the same customers with a similar market proposition. It will be fascinating to see who comes out on top, not least for tens of thousands of restaurants and UK businesses who will be caught in the crossfire, whose success and livelihood may depend on the outcome.  
In these uncertain times, it is imperative that restaurants adjust

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Internet Marketing

VRJAM and Agora partnership aims to provide sleek – and sustainable – VR event experience

The events industry in the UK is worth somewhere in the £40 billion area today. 2014 figures from BVEP put it just below that figure, while an AV Technology piece from last year spiked it at £42.3bn. 
This includes everything from the events themselves to travel costs – many readers will understand the ‘on the road’ mentality that comes with frequent executive international travel. But with climate awareness continuing to gain traction – Greta Thunberg currently being en route to New York via boat to send a message about ‘flight shaming’ – can more be done to curtail event travel?
VRJAM thinks so. The company has announced the launch of a partnership with Agora, a voice, video and interactive streaming platform, to create an ‘event technology platform’ utilising virtual reality

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Internet Marketing

Fashion retailers have multi-channel elements in place – but need to accelerate to omnichannel

Omnichannel may be the buzzword du jour right now when it comes to retail – but like many of these here-today terms there is often more than a kernel of truth. Where omnichannel differs from multi-channel is through its threading. A multi-channel retailer may have distinct presences both in its website, on social media as well as its physical store – but omnichannel truly links them together for a seamless customer experience.
With this in mind, a new report from Veeqo has analysed more than 60 UK fashion retailers exploring their omnichannel strategies and experiences – from the big names of Boohoo, River Island and Superdry to more innovative startups.
Of these retailers analysed, more than a third (37%) were online only, while almost half (49%) had a dedicated mobile

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Internet Marketing

Why marketers need to engage rather than enrage to solve the mobile advertising divide

Keeping a lid on problems doesn’t solve them — as the publishers still losing almost £1 million to ad blocking can confirm. Over the years, the ad block fight has slipped from the number one spot of industry problems; with declining general levels of blocked impressions and increasing advertising investment creating a perception the issue is under control. But that isn’t necessarily true.
Mobile is not only set to be a key driver of 2019’s £14.7 billion digital ad spend total; it’s also experiencing greater levels of ad blocking. Studies have shown a creeping increase in usage, with blockers detected during 8% of UK mobile sessions, and 32% of global mobile users blocking ads, only just behind PCs and laptops (37%).
While it may be moving at a relatively slow

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Internet Marketing

The three barriers stopping marketers investing in AI – and how to knock them down

Marketers love a buzzword. It makes sense – our industry is all about promoting and selling the latest thing. So it’s perhaps not surprising that the marketing industry has well and truly been taken in by what has to be the buzziest buzzword of the past couple of years – AI. The irony? For all the talk at industry events and in the media – never mind sales material – only 27% of marketers in the UK are actually using AI or machine learning in their jobs.
So, why are the majority of marketers not currently using AI? We conducted a piece of research with Vitreous World earlier this year to ask 400 marketers about the top barriers preventing them, and their businesses, from adopting this tech. Let’s take

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Internet Marketing

Personalisation strategies analysed: Potent brand messages found – if not 100% hit rate

To personalise, or not to personalise? Even though it’s phrased as a question, personalisation may seem more of a proclamation today – and while only half of consumers are actively signing up for a personalised experience right now, the numbers are only going to go up.
The latest study from Periscope By McKinsey, which polled more than 2000 consumers spread across France, Germany, the UK and the US, found brands who were already trusted by users were more likely to be given permission to personalise. Yet not everything is hitting the spot; approximately two in five users overall said most messages they received still felt like mass marketing that ‘wasn’t created with them in mind.’
The material deemed most likely to make it focused around messages about products relating to

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Internet Marketing

Programmatic ad viewability outperforming direct ads for first time, says report

A new study from Integral Ad Science (IAS) has noted a potential sea-change in terms of digital advertising, with programmatic desktop display ads in the UK outperforming publisher direct ads for the first time.
The Media Quality Report, which offers UK benchmarks for viewability, brand safety and ad fraud across digital environments and channels, noted that during the second half of 2018 almost seven in 10 (69.1%) programmatic UK desktop display ads met minimum viewability standards. Publisher direct ads, in contrast, were at just over two thirds (67.7%).
Viewability was determined as 50% of the ad unit in view for one continuous second for display and mobile advertising, 30% for one continuous second on large display ad formats, and 50% for two seconds for video ads, per the Media Ratings

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Internet Marketing

Taking personalisation to the next level – from data, to decisions, to design

Today’s shoppers are impervious to mass marketing techniques and expect personalisation that truly reflects their preferences. These were the findings from our recent research, “The Art of Personalization— Keeping it Relevant, Timely and Contextual”, where consumers in all countries surveyed said that most communications they receive still feel like mass marketing messages that weren’t created with them in mind (France 47%; UK 42%; Germany 40%; US 36%).
Despite the fact that shoppers say the vast majority of personalisation messages they receive often miss the mark, however, an impressive number were still prompted to check out an offer or make a purchase. In fact, around one-third of messages received by US (37%) and French (32%) consumers had stimulated them to act, while around one-quarter of messages received by German (27%)

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Internet Marketing

Please stand by: Exploring the future of media and entertainment – and the VR, AR, and AI tech advancing it

It has been 83 years since TV hit UK screens, nearly 40 since Channel 4 broke the boundaries of a three channel TV service, and just over seven years since all television broadcasts went from analogue to digital. There is estimated to be 27,000 hours of domestic content produced a year at a cost of £2.6 billion.  But that’s just TV.
We all know that how we consume media and our entertainment has evolved more in the last few years than it had in the last century.  Media consumers are now watching video content on a computer or a smartphone (92%) and 58% stream TV content via the Internet according to a recent survey by Salesforce.
We also know that more millennials discover content through personalised recommendations rather than

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Internet Marketing

The show must go on: Why contextual targeting is being called back to the stage

Brand safety scandal? The phrase alone is enough to send shivers down any marketer’s spine. After all, what could be worse than pumping big budgets into a perfectly planned campaign that inadvertently results in a brand appearing next to a terrorist video – or worse.
It’s no surprise that brand safety dominated conversations at Cannes – especially when new research by Ebiquity has revealed that a scary two thirds (65%) of Britain’s top 100 advertisers were exposed to potentially brand unsafe environments in the first quarter of this year alone.
Shifting mindsets – from where to how
Brands are understandably rattled – and many will be considering where to direct their spend to reach the right audiences while maintaining peace of mind. But rather than focusing on where to target

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Internet Marketing

How the concept of ‘unified commerce’ helps retailers avoid the pitfalls of omnichannel

Access to a wider range of products at the touch of a button and receiving highly personalised shopping recommendations based on past buying habits has led to a major shift in customer expectations. Today’s customers expect, as standard, a highly responsive, top quality service from retailers across all available channels.
As the volume of goods sold online continues to rise, UK retail stores on the high street look set to shift from holding large volumes of stock towards being more of a physical showroom for online outlets.
Tackling retail industry challenges
The increasing dominance of internet retail sales necessitates a strong online presence for all retail businesses. This in turn requires a reliable eCommerce platform. Despite a strong level of investment and willingness to adopt emerging technologies in the retail sector,

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Transcript of Creating Exponential Growth Through Hard Work, Not Magic

Transcript of Creating Exponential Growth Through Hard Work, Not Magic written by John Jantsch read more at Duct Tape Marketing

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Transcript

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John Jantsch: This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing broadcast is brought to you by Gusto, modern easy payroll benefits for small businesses across the country. And because you’re a listener you get three months free when you run your first payroll. Find out at gusto.com/tape.

John Jantsch: Hello. Welcome to another episode of the Duct Tape Marketing podcast. This is John Jantsch and my guest today is Brad Sugars. He is the founder and chairman of ActionCOACH , and the co-author of a book we’re going to talk about today, Pulling Profits Out of a Hat: Adding Zeroes to Your Company Isn’t Magic . Welcome back, Brad.

Brad Sugars: Hey, buddy. Good to be back, good to chat again.

John Jantsch: I’m a little disappointed in the title of this book because you claim that it’s not magic, and aren’t we all just looking for magic?

Brad Sugars: It was funny. I sat down with a buddy of mine at lunch about two years ago, and he says to me, “It just seems like magic the way these companies like Ikea, and Amazon, it just seems like magic the way they all keep growing and stuff.” I sat there and I said, “You don’t really believe that do you because, you know, magic is just a system as well. Magic is just a methodology of getting a result that looks like accidents. It’s just a system that people follow right behind it.” I think that he looked at me weird, and I looked at him weird. I said, “Do you know what, I’m going to write a book on this,” and so here we are two years later.

John Jantsch: I think you hit on a really good point. I think a lot of companies that do things, not household named company, I mean any company that you look at from the outside, and it just you use magic, or whatever term you use. I think sometimes magic, or genius, or growth it involves so many things that we don’t see, or don’t understand. I think the really great companies just make it look easy, don’t they?

Brad Sugars: Oh look, I think that the greatest of anything, any greats in anything, sport, acting, music, business, you name it, the greats make it look easy. My wife makes it look easy running our house with five kids and all of these things going on and stuff. That’s not that easy. It’s tough.

Brad Sugars: But, I think what we found in writing Pulling Profits is that when you look at businesses that are having real growth, and I mean exponential year-on-year growth, you notice something about them that is just different to other companies. It starts with that mindset of it is possible to have that level of growth.

John Jantsch: Let’s unpack that term because I was going to ask you about it because you use it throughout the book, this idea of exponential growth. I mean how is that different from year-over-year growth?

Brad Sugars: Well let’s think about this, so we go into most business scenarios, and you chat with the average business person, and they’re sitting there saying, “Well you know, what we’re looking for here is we’re looking for 20% or 30% growth.” My first challenge to all of them is, “Well, what about 10 times, 20 times, 30 times growth?” They look at you like you’re very weird. Multiplication growth is different to percentage growth. It’s like, “Well, how would we do that? What would have to happen in order for us to do that?” That’s where just that mental change just has to be there for a person to actually understand it. Probably the best example is that… Do you remember the movie, what was it called, The Founder, The Ray Kroc movie? Did you ever see that one?

John Jantsch: I did not.

Brad Sugars: I use the example of that because it shouldn’t have been The Founder. It should have been The Finder. Ray Kroc came along and he found this business, the McDonald Brothers. The McDonald Brothers were looking for annual growth, percentage growth. Ray Kroc comes in, and looks at it differently and say, “Okay, how do we put this on every street corner in America, and eventually every street corner in the world?” It’s looking at it from a different perspective.

Brad Sugars:  For me as an entrepreneur, right, I mean I just bought a company down in Melbourne, Australia. It’s a commercial cleaning business, and one down in Houston, Texas, a property management company. I look at them and they’re amazing businesses with a singular office. They do phenomenal things, great marketing, great sales systems, good culture, all of that sort of stuff. However, at no point are they considering opening up across the US, or across England, or across the world for that matter, and so it’s really just starting with that mindset, I guess, of exponential growth.

John Jantsch: Well, and you used the word mindset. For a lot of people they can’t ever get past this because they won’t allow themselves think that way.

Brad Sugars: I got to tell you buddy, it’s scary to think, okay, what if we went for 10 times, or 20 times growth and missed it? At least at 30% I’m safe. There is no real risk. All I got to do is work a little bit harder, a little bit more, push my people a bit better, train them a bit better, get a few more customers. Do you know what I mean? It’s that safety march. But, when we go and see companies that are growing exponentially, and we start seeing that level of just domination of a market very quickly, people sit up and go, “Oh, I don’t think we could do that.” Well yeah, you can, but there is a systematic methodology to it.

John Jantsch: Let’s talk about this word profit. I think one of the things that drives a lot of company is that bottom line mentality. That to reach for 10 times sometimes means maybe you won’t make a profit, or worse maybe you’ll have to kill the profit you’re already making because it’s going to require you to do things differently. You actually take profit on, and say maybe it’s not the sacred cow that it used to be.

Brad Sugars: The interesting thing is that what we look at in most business today, and this is where big business I guess has had this understanding for a long time, it’s the value of the company that we’re looking to build not necessarily the immediate profit of the business. Small business unfortunately lives with a day-to-day profit mentality rather than what’s the value of the business we’re building?

Brad Sugars:  Now, in the beginning I know with all of my small businesses when I first started out we needed that profit. We needed that tomorrow because if we didn’t have the profit we weren’t bootstrapping our way through, so I get that whole philosophy. But, I think that where we’re looking for profit, profit can be defined differently as we go forward in business today. Profit can be defined in retention of employees. It can be defined in retention of customers. It can be defined in how we add value to the community that we’re a part of, so there is many different ways to look at it, and within the book we go through the five main constituents and how you build, so that each of them actually gets a win.

Brad Sugars: Absolutely, I’m an accountant by training. The bottom line has still got to be there. You got to have that profitability for valuation. You’ve got to have that profitability to fund growth to do all those things. That’s an interesting debate, my friend, and I’m sure that we can continue it for years and years.

John Jantsch: Well, it’s interesting. You mentioned, and you talked about it in the book, the companies that do what you describe, pulling profits out of a hat, adding zeroes, do meet a win for all these constituencies. Do you find that companies that do that, do that intentionally, or maybe that’s just built into their mission, or who they are, or what they believe, and then it happens, or does it have to really be something that you sit down in a room and say, we’re going to do XYZ?

Brad Sugars: I personally think it’s about planning it because a lot of the companies we look at when it comes to matching the five constituencies, the five core disciplines, and when I look at the five core disciplines in the average organizations what I start to see is they’re pretty good at two, three of them. But then in the other two areas… And it normally depends on where the CEO or where the C level execs are strong. If they’re real strong in that people side of the business then obviously they’re going to have a fairly strong mission, and people development, and that sort of thing. It’s really a balancing act, my friend. I think that some people naturally stumble across it, but in most cases it’s a planned growth strategy.

John Jantsch: Let’s name them, strategy, business development, people, execution, and mission. I think you hit on a really good point. A lot of founders, solopreneurs, they start a company, they’re good at strategy, or they were great marketers, or they’re good at execution, and there is probably not too many human beings that are just wired to be good at all five of those disciplines, so how do you bring them all together?

Brad Sugars: It’s interesting because now through this book we’ve now developed a program for businesses to do that. What we find though buddy is this, and if I can spend a minute defining each one in a moment, but what we find is this, that in a business where the C level execs all just keep hiring other C level execs like themselves, or with an owner who hires people like themselves, very quickly the business leans in one direction. The differentiation of people is a core to a great team, and that’s a big part of it.

John Jantsch: Everyone loves payday, but loving a payroll provider that’s a little weird. Still, small businesses across the country love running payroll with Gusto. Gusto automatically files and pays your taxes. It’s super easy to use, and you can add benefits, and management tools to help take care of your team and keep your business safe. It’s loyal. It’s modern. You might fall in love yourself. Hey, and as a listener you get three months free when you run your first payroll, so try a demo and test it out at gusto.com/tape. That’s gusto.com/tape .

John Jantsch: We will come back maybe in the course of doing this, or you can outline them all, but one of the things I found interesting, most people start with mission. I’m not saying you necessarily put these in order, but I found it interesting that mission was the fifth of the disciplines.

Brad Sugars: If I’m going to start with a business, the first thing I look at is strategy because without strategy the business and how it delivers… And I’m not talking about are we using Facebook advertising? That’s a tactic. A strategy is the core of the business. Let’s say I went into the music business. I can go into the music business and I can be a drummer in a band. I’m still in the music business, or I can be Spotify, or iTunes, or something like that, or I can be right in the middle and be in a music production house, or something. Do you know what I mean? The strategy within which you attack it.

Brad Sugars: Even if you take iTunes, you go back to Apple’s strategy, their original strategy of make a computer sell a computer, they had to change strategy otherwise they were going to go bankrupt. Steve Jobs becomes a brilliant strategist and goes away and runs Pixar, learns leverage, which is one of the four components to strategy as well as learning great management, and leadership skills, comes back to Apple and says, “Hey, we got to get out of this make at once sell at once business,” and so he went into the music business where… And even more genius than me, Steve Jobs never make a song and sell them forever. I mean my definition of leverage is do the work once, get paid forever. If a business has to fight against leverage, if it’s getting a customer once and then they have to go and get another customer the next time, these are some of the things that fall under strategy.

Brad Sugars: Scalability falls under strategy. If a business today has to have human interaction to make a sale then its scalability factor is limited. We look at how Uber took out the human factor from the taxi business. Instead of having to make a phone call to a person who then dialed out and got another person to answer the phone call and then Uber goes straight through technology, no human interaction, boom, got the sale made. That’s how they can scale so fast.

John Jantsch: Do you know what’s interesting about that example is that technology was available to Yellow Taxi, but they choose not to employ it because it was going to shake up the status quo, and consequently they’re struggling now.

Brad Sugars: Well, the MP3 player was invented by Sony who is one of the biggest music companies in the world. Now, they’re paying 30 cents on the dollar to Apple to sell every song they make on a machine they invented, so just because you… That’s where execution comes in, I guess. That’s one of the five disciplines as well.

Brad Sugars: But also mission, I go back to mission because you mentioned that, and I think that one is really important, and whether it’s fifth, or… Because here’s the thing about the five of them, if I go into a company that’s really good at mission, and really good at say people, and execution, but its business development is struggling then it doesn’t matter what order we put them in because every business is different.

Brad Sugars: Apple, again, another success story on mission because mission is all about the word love in my opinion. Do your customers love buying from you? Do your staff love coming to work? In the days of the lowest levels of employee engagement we’ve seen in a long time, or maybe it’s just measured today, and it wasn’t always, we sit here thinking how do we get our people to love coming to work, and how do we get our customers to love buying from us, not just enjoy it, and not just buy from us because we’re cheaper, or we got better marketing, but because they love doing a transaction with us?

John Jantsch: Yeah. I think one of the things that’s tough for a lot of companies is some of these things, some of your disciplines require investment that maybe doesn’t drop to the bottom line, at least not immediately. I mean we all know it does.

Brad Sugars: Yeah.

John Jantsch: You’re happy engaged employees drop to the bottom line whether, or not they’re making a sale. I think that isn’t that one of the challenges for a lot of people? I don’t want to say it’s a leap of faith, but it’s a hey, we’re going to invest in mission and in people, and those may not immediately make a sale.

Brad Sugars: Yeah buddy look, for many years investing in my team, and investing in the humans in my business because that’s if you look at the discipline of people and try, and describe it real quick it’s how you build your people determines how they build your business. And if you don’t build your people then don’t expect them to… You can’t expect people to outperform their training. Let’s just make it that blunt.

Brad Sugars: I remember as a young man going to my dad, I think I was about 20, or 21, and I said to him, “Dad, I just can’t get good people. I can’t hire motivated good people.” He looked me dead in the eye and said, “Son, you get the people you deserve. You’re an average manager running an average business. The highest caliber of employee you should expect is average.” I’m like, “Hey, thanks dad. That was really, really great advice,” and it was. At the time, it stung like anything. I mean it was like thanks, wow.

Brad Sugars: But, what I’ve had to learn and what a lot of people have to learn is that if you don’t build your people… I mean how you recruit, hire, train, induct, mentor, manage, lead your people today determines where your business is at tomorrow. The longevity of business is all about building great people who build great businesses. I think that whole section of the book is quite eye-opening for a lot of people about how they want to build long term.

John Jantsch: I think it really comes down to how the leader of said business views those disciplines because there are a heck of a lot of business owners that I talk to that still think marketing, or business development in this case is a cost and that people are a cost as opposed to an investment.

Brad Sugars: I love that you bring that up because you and I every day agree on this wholeheartedly. The reality of marketing is if you’re doing it wrong it is an expense. If you’re doing it wrong it’s the dumbest thing you can ever do in your business, but if you’re doing it right it’s the world’s best investment, business development, your sales, your marketing, your customer service. I love that you use the word discipline now with me because we put it in this book as a discipline of business development and [inaudible] five disciplines because it’s not something you got right once and then you can just let it run. Your sales team needs to be trained daily, and brought up to speed daily because the markets shift.

Brad Sugars: I was with someone the other day and I said, “Tell me, do your customers know more about your competitors than your salespeople?” He said, “Oh, probably.” I said, “Well, then you’re out of business.” He looked at me and said, “What do you mean?” I said, “Well, if I’m a customer and I know the benefits of your competitor better than your sales people do, you can’t sell me. I can sell you, and what I’m selling you is that you can’t help me,” so yeah. I mean I wrote that whole book, Buying Customers, to teach entrepreneurs and executives about the whole principles of how much money you need to invest to buy customers.

John Jantsch: Does what you’re outlining in, Pulling Profits, change the role of the typical leader?

Brad Sugars: Dang buddy, that’s a tough question. I don’t think it changes it. Actually, I’ll give you an answer that I got. I was in Dublin last year giving a speech. She was a fun one because before me was Lady Michelle Mone who is a baroness and after me was Sir Richard Branson, so it was like the lady, the convict, and the lord. Sending an Australia up between a lady and a lord is funny. But, I got offstage, shook Sir Richard’s hand. He went up and did his gig. There was a question for him that said, “Have you had to change your management now with millennials?” He said, “No, we’ve always done good management.” I thought about that for a minute. To answer your question, does it change, no, it just requires you to actually do it. A great CEO, or a great entrepreneur will cover all five disciplines. I think that’s probably the simplest way to answer it.

John Jantsch: My follow-up to that really is, and I’m sure you hear this sometimes, it’s going to continue to evolve, it’s not… none of these disciplines are static as the company changes. I mean how do you keep this alive and fresh and engaging because it… I mean let’s face it, it’s exhausting to constantly be juggling all five of these balls?

Brad Sugars: Yeah, so is parenting. I got five kids. Juggling that is the same, I guess. I think it comes back to a very simple understanding and that is that do you remember Bill Gates did an interview many years ago where they said to him, “Are you every worried about somebody?” He said, “Listen, there is a kid in a garage somewhere and trying to put Microsoft out of business.” He was right, but it was two kids in a dorm room, Lowrie and Sergei, and they almost got him.

Brad Sugars:  The point behind that is that, that’s what I love about business. I love the fact that it’s always changing. I love the fact that it’s always growing and stuff. I can wait and follow, but the problem with imitation, or following someone else is that you’re second. The view don’t change too much, second, or third, but imitation doesn’t get there, so you’ve got to fall in love with the fact that you’ve got to keep growing and changing. I think the greatest execs and entrepreneurs do love that about business.

John Jantsch: Brad, where can people find out more? Obviously, at actioncoach.com , but also about the book itself?

Brad Sugars: The book, they can jump on pullingprofits.com , or any great bookstore, buddy, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, you name it. It’s sitting on their shelves I’m sure, and they’re selling them for me, or they can jump on any of the social media platforms. You’ll find me on Insta, and Facebook, and LinkedIn, and You Tube, and all those, probably not Pinterest, no you won’t, actually definitely not Pinterest. I’m not that crafty.

John Jantsch: One of those things I meant to point that I forgot, one of the things I love in chapter six you show each of these disciplines we’ve been talking about. You actually had an assessment for us, so we can not only fully, or more fully understand the discipline, but also measure where we are in that. I love books and resources that do that because I think in some cases maybe we learn better by doing that kind of assessment.

Brad Sugars: Yeah, it’s interesting. When we sit with businesses, and they fulfill that assessment they start to really understand a bit of a benchmark as to where they’re at versus other businesses not just within their own realm because sometimes the challenge is we can’t see the forest through the trees. We might think, okay, we’re doing great at the people as a discipline, but then we go and do the tests and we realize, hang on, we’re not keeping up where the market is today.

John Jantsch: Yeah. It’s hard sometimes to… You get really lulled to sleep sometimes in your own business, and it really does take a look outside to, or somebody else, a third party come looking in to help out.

Brad Sugars: Hence, ActionCOACH, buddy. That’s probably the reason why ActionCOACH is still around for that exact reason. It’s hard to see what’s in your own business.

John Jantsch: Pulling Profits Out of a Hat, co-authored by Brad Sugars. Thanks, Brad. Hopefully, we’ll catch up with you sometime out there on the road.

Brad Sugars: Hey John, great to be here. By the way, anyone listening to this for the first time please subscribe. I love what you’re doing, John. I’m really a fan of all of the podcasts. Thanks, buddy.

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